•  
  •  
 

Document Type

Article

Media Type

Text

Abstract

In American political theory, a state constitution is the supreme and fundamental law of a state. A state constitution must meet present and foreseeable needs, but must also allow for appropriate change to address evolving needs and conditions. The 1970 Illinois Constitution directs that, at least once every twenty years, the question of whether a state constitutional convention should be called must be submitted to the voters. In 2008, the second automatic proposed call for a state constitutional convention overwhelmingly failed. This article explains the history, theory, and purposes of state constitutions in the American political system. The article recounts the background, framing, and ratification of the 1970 Illinois Constitution. Further, it describes the contents of the Illinois Constitution and explains how the document fulfills the general purposes of state constitutions, demonstrating that the Illinois Constitution remains adaptable to new situations and changing circumstances. The article concludes that Illinois voters at the November 2008 general election correctly voted "NO" for the call for a state constitutional convention.

First Page

269

Last Page

348

Publication Date

5-1-2010

Department

Other

ISSN

0734-1490

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University Law Review

Included in

Law Commons

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.