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Authors

Paul A. Isaac

Document Type

Article

Media Type

Text

Abstract

This article introduces the contemporary significance of the Assyrian Question--the longstanding inquiry over the rights of a small religious and ethnic minority in Iraq. Recently, Assyrians have been violently targeted and disproportionately driven from postwar Iraq in massive numbers, threatening to obliterate their presence from their ancestral homeland forever. Addressing their legal rights, the author argues that Assyrians are an indigenous people under international law and are, therefore, entitled to the full exercise of their political, social, and cultural self-determination. The article surveys the international law of self-determination alongside provisions of Iraqi law that have been created to protect Assyrians. Briefly examining how autonomy-based solutions have been applied as legitimate remedies to self-determination rights, the author argues that some form of heightened self-governance for the Assyrian people would be appropriate under the circumstances, and would be consistent with international and Iraqi law. Some heightened form of self-administration is then further defended on the grounds that it can promote democracy, protect a vulnerable population, and enhance economic equity.

First Page

209

Last Page

243

Publication Date

11-1-2008

Department

College of Law

ISSN

0734-1490

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University Law Review

Included in

Law Commons

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