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Authors

David Helscher

Document Type

Article

Media Type

Text

Abstract

In 1965, the United States Supreme Court recognized a constitutional right of privacy in marital sexual matters in Griswold v. Connecticut. In the thirty years since the decision, privacy rights have been extended to some areas of sexual expression, reproductive choices and classes of individuals. The right of privacy set out in Griswold has not been extended to all areas of sexual matters. An examination of the landmark case, its historical support for the right of privacy, and subsequent case development draw into question the Supreme Court's 1986 decision in Bowers v. Hardwick and possible future appeals based on an individual's constitutional right to be free from governmental intrusion into private adult consensual conduct.

First Page

33

Last Page

62

Publication Date

11-1-1994

Department

Other

ISSN

0734-1490

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University Law Review

Included in

Law Commons

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