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Authors

Lisa M. Stozek

Document Type

Article

Media Type

Text

Abstract

This note examines Wisconsin v. Mitchell, wherein the United States Supreme Court ruled that the Constitution does not forbid "hate crime statutes" which lengthen the sentence of a criminal defendant for committing a bias-motivated crime. The author identifies a long line of First Amendment cases that are arguably contradictory to the Court's holding and examines the potential impact the decision's limit on free expression may have on society and free speech. The author concludes that while the Court's goal of suppressing hate crimes was admirable, the decision treads dangerously close to criminalizing speech and thought.

First Page

861

Last Page

887

Publication Date

7-1-1994

Department

College of Law

ISSN

0734-1490

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University Law Review

Included in

Law Commons

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