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Authors

Paul T. Donahue

Document Type

Article

Media Type

Text

Abstract

This note examines the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeal's decision refusing to strike down a public school board rule which prohibited social dancing inside the public schools of Purdy, Missouri. The issue facing the court was how far local religious groups could go in influencing public school policy. The court of appeals reversed the ruling of the trial court which found that the prohibition on social dancing was a result of local religious pressure and thus in violation of the Establishment Clause of the Federal Constitution. The author concludes that the decision of the court of appeals ignored the power of a prohibition as a tool of religious instruction and concludes further that allowing local religious majorities to affirmatively influence public school policy is inconsistent with the Establishment Clause.

First Page

119

Last Page

154

Publication Date

11-1-1990

Department

College of Law

ISSN

0734-1490

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University Law Review

Included in

Law Commons

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