Author

Neil Tobin

Publication Date

1-1-1988

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Berkowitz, Gerald M.

Degree Name

B.A. (Bachelor of Arts)

Department

Department of English

Abstract

“The Golden Apple” is an undeservingly forgotten milestone of the American musical. It was of great value in 1954: it had stunning choreography, great sets, a creative director and performers. It was influential, in that it was the first truly integrated musical, in which music and dance were blended completely into the narrative. And it was unanimously praised by critics and audiences alike but, due to mismanagement, wasn’t sustained on Broadway long enough to carve an enduring niche for itself. Despite this misfortune, the show still has lasting value: in its entertaining but intelligent plot, which is based on Homer’s Illiad and Odessey, as if they were to occur in turn-of-the-century America; in its versatile music; and its witty lyrics. Although it superseded such shows as “Kismet” and “Can-Can” to win the Critics Circle Award for Best Musical, it isn’t being performed now. It deserves to be staged.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

29 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Alt Title

Musical theater lost and found : "The golden apple"

Media Type

Text

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