Author

Aparna Rae

Publication Date

1-1-2006

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Barnes, Michael

Degree Name

B.S.Ed. (Bachelor of Science in Education)

Department

School of Art

Abstract

For my Honor's Capstone Project, I am explored the idea of oppositional dualism through process in intaglio. Printmaking as an art media that allows an artist to render realistic images on the plate but allow for processes where the image remains a mystery to the artist until the plate is removed from the etching solution. Over and over again the image is a mystery, often one that is pleasant to look at after its revelation. Sometimes the explorations can cause images that are hard to read or those that simply refuse to appear, print after print. Intaglio is a printmaking technique where the image is built up by grooves and areas which lie below the surface of a metal plate, usually copper. To make a print from the etched plate, ink is pushed into the grooves, and the surface of the plate wiped clean. The plate is then put onto a press bed with dampened paper on top and run through the press, drawing the ink out of the grooves and onto the paper. For the capstone, I created six 18" x 24" plates and six 12" x I8iplates that I printed, often in groups of 2-3 creating a deep image that was open to the viewer's interpretation. Although I created multiple prints from each plate, no two prints looked alike. To showcase my work, I installed seven pieces at the Latino Resource Center, and had an exhibition with an opening reception.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

11 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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