Publication Date

1-1-2014

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Wallace, Douglas G.

Degree Name

B.S. (Bachelor of Science)

Department

Department of Biological Sciences

Abstract

Animals use environmental (visual, auditory, olfactory) and self-movement (vestibular, proprioception, optic flow) cues to maintain spatial orientation (Gallistel, 1990). Disruptions in spatial orientation are frequently associated with acute (stroke) and chronic (Dementia of the Alzheimer’s Type) neurological disorders; however, the nature of the processing deficit continues to be debated. Previous work has demonstrated that rats use self-movement cues to organize their exploratory behavior (Wallace, et al., 2006). Recent work has suggested a role for the human prefrontal cortex structures in self-movement cue processing related to dead reckoning or path integration (Wolbers, et al., 2007) The current study uses the organization of rat exploratory behavior under dark conditions to investigate the role of specific areas within the frontal cortex in self-movement cue processing.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

10 unnumbered pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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