Publication Date

12-5-2021

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Sandberg, Brian, 1968-

Degree Name

B.A. (Bachelor of Arts)

Department

Department of History

Abstract

This research project uses primary sources such as regimental histories, records kept by the Adjutant General of Illinois, reporting from the Chicago Tribune, and the published and unpublished memoirs, diaries, and letters of both soldiers and civilians to examine the role communities played in military mobilization in Chicago during the Civil War. An urban environment like Chicago had many such communities, including religious denominations, professional and commercial organizations, militia units, immigrant communities, and political organizations. These communities strongly impacted the mobilization process in Chicago by organizing and supporting certain units, and individual Chicagoans were influenced by their community affiliations when deciding whether to enlist and in which units. In addition to shedding light on how the Civil War was experienced in Chicago, this research has further implications for future research on both military mobilization and Civil War soldiers' motivations.

Extent

40 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU capstones are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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