Author

Dan Riffell

Publication Date

1-1-1995

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Polans, Neil O.

Degree Name

B.S. (Bachelor of Science)

Department

Department of Biological Sciences

Abstract

Molecular genetic techniques can be used to provide insights into the evolutionary process and the history of relationships among organisms. Research in this field is based on the fact that DNA sequences can be used for inferring genetic affinities. The present study involves the use of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA sequences (RAPDs) to investigate the associations among 80 selected taxa of pea (Pisum sativum L.). Cladistic analyses of the RAPD characters produced a hypothesis (of phylogenetic branch sequences) called a cladogram. The findings of this survey suggest that there are two main taxa within the genus Pisum, P. fuivum and P. sativum, with most of the genetic variation observed restricted to the subspecific level. The hypotheses drawn here are not definitive, however. With the large number of taxa selected for this study, more RAPD characters are required to establish a credible genealogy and to answer questions raised concerning P. humile, P. elatius, and P. abyssinicum.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

14 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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