Publication Date

12-8-2019

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Wiemer, Katja

Degree Name

B.S. (Bachelor of Science)

Department

Department of Biological Sciences

Abstract

Depression has been linked to an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. Depression is a mood disorder that results in low mood, while Alzheimer’s Disease is a progressive, neurological disorder that results in memory issues and difficulty with completing everyday tasks. The purpose of this research study was to determine what role depression plays in Alzheimer’s Disease, how depression affects mild cognitive impairment, and what brain abnormalities are present in individuals with depression and Alzheimer’s Disease. To find out if depression increases Alzheimer’s Disease, certain research experiments were reviewed to see what the results would indicate. After examining several literature sources, it was concluded that depression changes the brain circuitry in people; it causes brain changes in the frontal and limbic circuitry that can lead to amyloid production. Amyloid plaques are the findings in deceased Alzheimer’s Disease patients. These changes in depression patients may lead to mild cognitive impairment. When individuals reach this stage of mild cognitive impairment, they have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease in the future. The reason this correlation is important is because both disorders, depression and Alzheimer’s Disease are genetic. Depression is a mood disorder that can be cured with antidepressants. Alzheimer’s Disease, on the other hand, is a neurological disorder that doesn’t have a cure. However, if depression really does increase the risk of individuals developing Alzheimer’s Disease in the future, this is important to note because depression is something that can cured. If depression can be cured, the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease can be decreased. To conclude, all these researchers were able to find out that depression indirectly affects Alzheimer’s Disease. Depression causes mild abnormal brain dysfunctions that may lead to mild cognitive impairment. When individuals reach this stage, they have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease.

Extent

14 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS