Publication Date

1-1-1996

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

King, Richard B.

Degree Name

B.S. (Bachelor of Science)

Department

Department of Biological Sciences

Abstract

Garter snakes were used to study changes in feeding frequency and behavior associated with ecdysis. Feeding and shedding records of a captive snake colony were combined to test for correlations between feeding frequency and shedding. Snakes ate significantly less frequently before shedding than after shedding. Likelihood of eating was lowest when snakes were in the blue-eyed state. Four behaviors; latency to move, strikes at a stationary stimulus, strikes at a moving stimulus, and response distance to an approaching threat were scored while snakes were in the blue-eyed and clear-eyed state. Latency to move, strikes at a moving stimulus, and response distance were significantly affected by the shedding state of the snake. Changes in feeding frequency and behavior associated with shedding may function to reduce the risk of predation during a period of increased vulnerability.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

26 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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