Author

Kevin L. Crow

Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Silber, Kenneth H.

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment

LCSH

College students with disabilities--Services for--United States||Distance education--United States||Internet in education--United States

Abstract

This study utilized a blended approach to acquire data that contained both qualitative and quantitative elements in order to better understand how U.S. universities are ensuring accessibility and/or providing accommodations to on-line degree-seeking students who have disabilities. Data for this research was collected by interviewing leading disabilities advocates and subject-matter experts regarding accessibility, adaptive technologies, and disabilities. Data were also collected by surveying individuals from the student disability services offices at 151 U.S. universities that held the Carnegie Foundation Classification of Doctoral/Research University - Extensive during the months of July and August, 2006. This study uncovered four primary findings. First, subject-matter experts who were interviewed for this study noted that they believed that American colleges and universities were not adequately meeting the needs of on-line students with disabilities. Second, universities that participated in this research study tended to grant the accommodation requests that were made by their on-line students with disabilities during the 2005/2006 academic year. Third, universities that participated in this research study tended to report that they received positive feedback regarding the granting of accommodation requests that were made by their on-line students with disabilities during the 2005/2006 academic year. Fourth, data gathered from the survey portion of this study suggest that the overwhelming majority of front-line accessibility personnel (student disability services or its equivalent) are not adequately aware of the issues relating to the accessibility of university-related electronic information and technology that are routinely encountered by postsecondary students with disabilities.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [176]-186).

Extent

viii, 217 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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