Publication Date

1962

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Katz, Jack||Williams, J. David||Shearer, William M.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Speech

LCSH

Hearing

Abstract

Twenty young normal listeners and ten young listeners who had histories of central nervous system (CNS) damage were administered a competing message test. His normal subjects experienced almost no difficulty whatsoever in repeating the Staggered Spondaic Words (SSW). The six subjects with unilateral (trauma) damage had the greatest difficulty in the ear contralateral to the affected hemisphere. The four bilaterally damaged (cerebral palsy) subjects demonstrated the greatest number of errors. The results of this study support the literature concerning the behavior of normal and central damaged individuals. That is, standard pure-tone and speech tests do not necessarily differentiate the normal group from the CNS group. It appears that the SSW test may well prove to be an accurate indicator of higher auditory center involvement.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

v, 29 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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