Publication Date

1964

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Novak, Ralph S.||Hackamack, Lawrence C. (Lawrence Carroll), 1921-

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Management

LCSH

Employees--Training of||Programmed instruction||Milling-machines--Numerical control

Abstract

A modern machining concept known as numerical control is censing a revolution in the traditional manufacturing methods employed by the nation's metalworking industry. The many advantages which this type of machining purportedly offers are cited as major factors in the tremendous growth which numerical control has recorded in the twelve years of its existence. A still more phenomenal growth is promised for the future. Numerical control is not capable of producing finished parts entirely without human intervention. It is completely dependent upon the information supplied to it for all of its motions and other control functions. The person who has the unique responsibility of supplying this information is called a part programmer. This individual is not available in the labor market in sufficient numbers to meet the continually increasing demand for his services, New sources from which part programming personnel can be obtained, must be found. It is, therefore, the intent of this study to determine some valid information regarding the background experiences and formal education requirements of personnel who might be considered as having the potential to perform successfully as part programmers for numerical control. The method employed to gather data for this study was to go directly to users of numerical control. A questionnaire was formulated and mailed to one-hundred-ninety companies. The seventy-nine companies which completed this questionnaire were assumed to form a universe and the analysis and interpretation of data was performed within the framework of this universe. Two major areas of investigation were included in this analysis. First, the shop-oriented, non-college graduate part programmer was investigated in relation to the college graduate part programmer. Second, the shop-oriented, non-college graduate part programmer with no formal education beyond the high school diploma was investigated in relation to the shop-oriented, non-college graduate part programmer with some formal education beyond the high school diploma. Several conclusions were reached on the basis of these investigations. It appears that the shop-oriented, non-college graduate does have the potential to perform successfully as a part programmer for numerical control. It also seems safe to state that this type of individual can achieve nearly the same degree of skills as the college graduate part programmer. Further, it appears that the shop-oriented, non-college graduate with no formal education beyond the high school diploma, can perform successfully as a part programmer for numerical control, in some instances. This type of individual, however, does not appear to be able to attain the same level of skills as the shop-oriented, non-college graduate with some formal education beyond the high school diploma. Several conclusions were reached on the basis of these investigations. It appears that the shop-oriented, non-college graduate does have the potential to perform successfully as a part programmer for numerical control. It also seems safe to state that this type of individual can achieve nearly the same degree of skills as the college graduate part programmer. Further, it appears that the shop-oriented, non-college graduate with no formal education beyond the high school diploma, can perform successfully as a part programmer for numerical control, in some instances. This type of individual, however, does not appear to be able to attain the same level of skills as the shop- oriented, non-college graduate with some formal education beyond the high school diploma.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

xi, 172 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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