Publication Date

1970

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Crank, Floyd L.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Speech||Department of Business Education

LCSH

Typewriting||Shorthand

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the early introduction of typewritten transcription on achievement in beginning shorthand. The hypothesis to be tested was that the early introduction of typewritten transcription in beginning shorthand has no effect on the development of reading rates, dictation speeds, transcription speeds, mailable letters, and theory knowledge. Nine matched pairs were selected from two beginning shorthand classes at Elk Grove High School, Elk Grove Village, Illinois. The pairs were matched on the basis of grade point average and beginning typing speeds. Both classes were taught in exactly the same manner except that during the first semester the experimental group was given instruction in typewritten transcription. During this time the control group did longhand transcription. During the second semester both classes were taught in exactly the same manner. At the end of the first semester of instruction the matched pairs were compared on the basis of their reading rate scores. At the end of the first year the matched pairs were compared on the basis of the total number of errors made on all theory tests given, the average of the five highest transcription rates, the average of the five best mailable letter grades, and the average of the two best dictation speeds achieved. The findings of the study showed that 1) there was no significant difference on the reading rates achieved at the end of one semester of instruction by the two groups; 2) there was no significant difference on the dictation speeds achieved at the end of one year of instruction by the two groups; 3) there was no significant difference on the mailable letter averages achieved at the end of one year of instruction by the two groups; 4) there was a significant difference on the theory test scores achieved at the end of one year of instruction by the two groups and this difference favored the control group; 5) there was no significant difference on the transcription rates achieved at the end of one year of instruction by the two groups. On the basis of the findings of this study the hypothesis cannot be rejected.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages 19-20)

Extent

53 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS