Publication Date

1964

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Sharp, Emmit F.||Burchard, Waldo W.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

LCSH

Sociology--Study and teaching||Social classes||Social ethics

Abstract

The first objective of this research was to assess the relationships between the extent of dogmatism (as measured by the Rokesch Dogmatism Scale, Form E) and sociology grades (received by 405 introductory sociology students at North­ ern Illinois University during the fall semester of 1963)# social class position (as measured by a modification of the Hollingshead-Redlich Index of Social Position)# and social values (as measured by Allport’s Study of Values). To accomplish this purpose three null hypotheses were set up as follows: (1) No significant differences in sociology grades exist between high and low dogmatic students, (2) No significant differences in class status exist between high and low dogmatic students, and (3) No significant differences in social values exist between high and low dogmatic students. The second objective of this research was to correlate the results with a similar study by Dr. Robert M. Frumkin which took place at the State University of New York In Oswego, New York. To accomplish this purpose the results obtained for each hypothesis were compared with Frumkin's results. Three major statistical devices were used wherever possible to test the above relationships, namely, a sampling distribution between means, the chi-square analysis, and the Pearson or product-moment coefficient correlation. %6) of the findings of this research Included the following: (1) the rejection of Hypothesis I, thus establish­ing a relationship between dogmatism and academic achievement; high dogmatic students are more likely to achieve less than low dogmatic students, (2) the rejection of Hypothesis II, thus establishing a relationship between dogmatism and class status; the lower an individual's class position the high­er his dogmatism, (3) no rejection of Hypothesis III, thus failing to establish a relationship between an individual's social values and the extent of his dogmatism, (4) a definite relationship between the findings of this study and Frumkin's regarding Hypothesis I, (5) a definite relationship between the findings of this study and Frumkin's regarding Hypothesis II, and (6) no definite relationship between the two studies regarding the types of specific values which support the various degrees of dogmatism which may be present within an individual.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

vi, 54 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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