Publication Date

1964

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Schmuller, Allen M. (Allen Mark)||Miller, Carroll H. (Carroll Hiram), 1907-

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Guidance and Counseling

LCSH

Educational tests and measurements||Ability--Testing

Abstract

It was the purpose of this study to measure the correlation between the battery scores of a group intelligence test anti a group achievement test. The hypothesis of the study was that the resulting correlation would indicate that a relatively high positive relationship existed between the tests. This hypothesis was based on readings which indicated a certain similarity or overlapping between the two types of tests. The subjects used in this study were 113 fourth graders from Iowa Elementary School and York-Center Elementary School both of which are located in District 45 which encompasses Villa Park, Illinois and part of Bombard, Illinois. York Center Elementary School was selected because the author of this study taught there; Iowa Elementary School was chosen at random. The tests were selected by the School District administrators. A statistical study of the two areas served by the schools was presented because an integration experiment was and is currently being conducted. The total battery scores from each child’s tests were arranged in a scattergram from which the calculations necessary to compute the coefficient of correlation according to the Pearson Product-Moment were gathered. The findings which resulted indicated that the coefficient of correlation was .715 which indicates that a relatively high positive correlation exists between the California Achievement Test and the SRA Primary Mental Abilities Tests in this study. This relatively high positive relationship further indicates that the integration experiment apparently was not a factor of serious concern. The value of this study is an indication that by knowing a relatively high positive relationship exists between these two tests, a teacher is better able to be aware of yet another facet of tests. This is desirable in these times because as Leland and Steir point out, an interest in Intelligence and IQ scores is in an upsurge as better-educated, more well-informed parents indicate.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

iv, 30 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS