Publication Date

1966

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Crank, Floyd L.||Maxwell, Lyle

Degree Name

M.S. Ed. (Master of Education)

Department

Department of Business Education

LCSH

Consumer education||Consumers

Abstract

The problem was to determine the consumer economic understandings possessed by adult employees of the Gromer Supermarkets, Elgin, Illinois, and the seniors who had completed a semester course in Consumer Economic Problems at Forest View High School, Arlington Heights, Illinois. In order to solve the problem, It was necessary to answer the following questions: 1. What consumer economic understandings do adults and students have regarding principles of buying, insurance, credit and money management, and savings and investment? 2. Do education, age, and sex affect consumer economic understandings regarding principles of buying, insurance, credit and money management, and savings and investment? A survey was devised which would indicate the extent of consumer economic understandings in the areas of principles of buying, insurance, credit and money management, and savings and investment. The survey was given to 90 adult employees of the Gromer Supermarkets and 100 seniors at Forest View High School. On the basis of test scores, adults scored 64.69 per cent. Students scored 60.43 per cent. The number of years of schooling had no influence on the scores of the adults. Those adults over 30 years of age generally scored higher than the younger adults. The adult males scored higher than adult females. Student males scored higher than student females. The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. The test score of 64.69 per cent made by the adults would indicate that the education, background, and experiences of the adults have not prepared them to be effective consumers. 2. The score of 60.43 per cent made by the students would indicate that were were not as well prepared as the adults to be effective consumers. 3. More schooling would be of little real value, unless that schooling emphasized the importance of being a good consumer, and actually taught some of the principles and techniques of how to be an effective consumer. The following recommendations are made: 1. More emphasis should be given to practical and meaningful consumer economic education. 2. All high school students should complete a course in consumer education. 3. More should be done to emphasize the importance of being a more intelligent consumer.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

viii, 117 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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