Publication Date

2020

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Gau, Jenn-Terng

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Legacy Department

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Abstract

Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanotube is one of the most extensively studied nanotubes due to its wide applications in electronics and medical fields. In this study, we used electrochemical anodization to create nanotubes on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) samples and examined the adhesiveness of the nanotube layer on the sample surface. Particularly we conducted micro-limiting dome height (µLDH) tests on anodized Cp-Ti foils of 38 µm thickness and 4 mm diameter at room temperature, 100℃, and 200℃. We also conducted tensile tests on standard tensile specimens of anodized Cp-Ti plate at room temperature, and 200℃. The Hitachi S-4500 Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope was used to take the high magnification images of the nanotubes on the surface of the Cp-Ti samples. The ImageJ software was used to analyze the shapes and qualities of the nanotubes on the surface of anodized Cp-Ti samples. The same process was also used to examine the integrity of the nanotube layers after the Cp-ti samples underwent two tests.

For the best outcome of the nanotube layer on the foil samples, we tested anodization under varying voltages and anodization time through trial and error. We found that the combinations of 20V and 15, 30, and 45 minutes produced nanotube layers of sufficient quality. We also found that an increase in anodization time caused the nanotube layer to be unstable. Using the µLDH tests, we determined the maximum punch travel distance (Hd) that the Cp-Ti foil samples could withstand without damaging the TiO2 nanotube layer on surfaces. We found that the samples prepared using 20V for 15 minutes tolerated a Hd of 0.9 mm at room temperature. Samples prepared with a longer anodization time showed a lower Hd. Also, a higher testing temperature decreased Hd.

For the tensile testing samples, we found that the combinations of 20 V 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes anodization time produced nanotube layers of sufficient quality. Using the standard tensile test procedures, we found that the samples prepared at 20 V for 15 minutes withstood a maximum strain of 0.03 at the room temperature without damaging the nanotube layer on the surface. Samples prepared with a longer anodization time or tested under a higher testing temperature tolerated a lower strain without damage to the nanotubes layer.

In summary, we found that the combination of 20V and 15-minute anodization time produced the best results in the creation of the nanotube layer on the surface of Cp-Ti samples in terms of its ability in withstanding deformation and temperature changes. These results serve careful considerations in further research and applications.

Extent

100 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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