Publication Date

1968

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Pecenka, Joseph O.||Andreasen, Haakon L.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Management

LCSH

Race relations--Research

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify, compare, and analyze selected economic characteristics of the white and nonwhite populations of the Chicago Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area in order to discover what, if any, differences existed between the two groups. The time periods for which data were sought included the years 1950, 1960, and subsequent years for which data were available. Data was gathered in the main from the 1950 and 1960 Censuses of Population. Additional data for later time periods was sought from a review of related literature, and from the various government offices which produce such data. The facts concerning the economic differentials studied usually required some statistical modification in order 'to present and compare data in the desired manner. Subsequent to this, the data were analyzed from the viewpoint of depicting trends and noting differences between the two groups studied. 1/here appropriate, the statistical technique of testing for significant differences was employed. The following conclusions were made from the findings: 1. There has been no substantial narrowing of the different average incomes of the white and nonwhite populations. The nonwhite population was thus at a greater relative economic disadvantage because of the higher white income. 2. There has been no substantial narrowing of the different unemployment rates of the white and nonwhite populations. This placed nonwhites at a greater relative economic disadvantage because of the lessened opportunity to gain income through employment. 3. Neither the white nor the nonwhite populations were placed at a greater relative economic disadvantage by their civilian labor force participation rates or their underemployment experience. 4. Considering the proportion of total employed workers for each population group, there has been no substantial increase in the per cent of white-collar jobs held by nonwhites. This placed them at a greater relative economic disadvantage because these were generally the highest-paying jobs. 5. Considering the proportion of total employed workers for each population group, there has been no substantial increase in the per cent of jobs in major industries for nonwhites, except for the Personal Services and Public Administration industries. 6. The economic burden of the nonwhite population was greater than that of the white population. This was due to lower educational levels, more dependents to support, more family members to support, and a higher ratio of rent to income. 7. Taken as a whole, the data indicated that the economic differentials between the white and nonwhite populations generally favored the white population. 8. The economic differences found to exist in the Chicago SMSA support the findings made by the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. It was recommended that further study might be worthwhile in the areas of social, psychological, and political behavior differences between whites and nonwhites. Such data would be especially useful for geographic units smaller than states. Finally, the 1970 Census will afford an opportunity to compare trends and findings developed in this study.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

xii, 94 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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