Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

White, Karen J.

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--Treatment--Public opinion||Teachers--Attitudes

Abstract

Implicit theories have been used to understand how people think about themselves and others and react in the face of various challenges. An incremental theory indicates belief that a person is able to change some aspect of him or herself and is associated with a “mastery” response (i.e., persistence in the face of failure). An entity theory indicates belief that a person is unable to change some aspect of Mm- or herself and is associated with a “helplessness” response (i.e., giving up after a failure). The current study examined teachers’ implicit theories of Attention- Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in order to gain understanding of how teachers think about and react to behavior problems associated with ADHD. The two types of implicit theory and child medication status were examined in relation to 1) effort attributions about inappropriate behavior, 2) intent to implement a behavioral intervention, and 3) expectation for success of a behavioral intervention. Teachers were asked to respond to a vignette detailing the behavior of a child with ADHD. It was predicted that incremental theorists would make more effort attributions about die misbehavior of a child with ADHD, report Mgher intent to implement a behavioral intervention, and report higher expectation for success of a behavioral intervention. Participants included 177 people either teaching in schools or enrolled in graduate education classes. One hundred twenty-two participants met the criteria for analysis, and 100 met criteria for analysis of implicit theories (i.e., fell into a distinct implicit theory category versus “inconclusive”). Results indicated that teachers with an incremental theory about a child with ADHD are more likely to make effort attributions about the misbehavior of a child with ADHD. Teachers with different implicit theories about a child with ADHD did not differ on reported intent to implement a behavioral intervention or expectation for success of a behavioral intervention. Results are discussed with regard to implications for teacher training in behavioral intervention for ADHD.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages 84-88).

Extent

vi, 118 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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