Author

Kaneez Fatima

Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Jung, Myoungwhon

Degree Name

M.S. Ed. (Master of Education)

Department

Department of Special and Early Education

LCSH

Early childhood education||Educational leadership||School management and organization

Abstract

Educational administrators are thought to affect the quality of curricular programs they direct. Inadequate academic qualifications, lack of professional expertise, and paucity of in-service professional development programs are some major factors that impact adversely the principals' performance of targeted responsibilities. This study aims to explore principals' professional expertise for improving the quality of early childhood education classroom practices in Illinois. Qualitative collective case-study methods were used; four early childhood principals were selected through a purposive sampling technique. Data were collected through semi-structured interview protocols. Findings of the study indicate that in-service professional development training opportunities for preschool and early childhood education principals vary from district to district and are mostly related to school administration and supervision. All the principals believed in collaboration among administration and staff, an important strategy for professional development of their teachers. The data also revealed that time, retention and hiring of teachers, and financial resources are some challenges principals face when implementing knowledge gained from professional development trainings. Communication, technology, teacher evaluation and scoring, planning and preparation, and establishing a multi-tiered support system for the children were highlighted as principals' future professional development needs.

Comments

Advisors: Myoungwhon Jung.||Committee members: Greg Conderman; Robin Miller Young.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

v, 58 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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