Publication Date

1979

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Lange, Charles H.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Anthropology

LCSH

Cherokee Indians

Abstract

The Cherokee Indians have been called one of the civilized tribes because they so readily adopted white man's ways. Although Cherokee culture underwent numerous upheavals in all areas, the most far-reaching change was made in their religion. This thesis will investigate the function of the Cherokee Little People within a beginning context of eighteenth and nineteenth century culture, examine Cherokee religion, world view, and religious practices, and explore vestiges of their belief system in the twentieth century. Upon investigating twenty Cherokee Little People stories, it was found that the Little People functioned as protectors, helpers, and alleviators of loneliness. They also provided the individual with a sense of his own personal worth, offered an element of security, and furnished those Cherokees who wished to retain traditional beliefs a way of coping with the frustrations of living in a changing world.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

ii, 64 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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