Author

Linda Huber

Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Demaray, Michelle K.

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Bullying--Psychological aspects||Middle school students--Social networks||Teenagers--Social networks||Anxiety in adolescence

Abstract

The current study evaluated the association between social anxiety and peer victimization as it relates to self-concept and sources of social support in middle school students. Prior research studies have shown the relation between social anxiety and peer victimization influences future social functioning. The purpose of this study was to contribute to the current body of research on social anxiety and peer victimization by evaluating associations among middle school students' social anxiety, peer victimization, self-concept, and specific sources of social support. Specifically, the following research questions were addressed: 1) What is the relation between peer victimization and social anxiety in middle school students? Are there gender differences in this association? 2) Does self-concept mediate or moderate the relation between peer victimization and social anxiety in middle school students? 3) Does classmate support or parent support moderate the relation between peer victimization and social anxiety? To address these questions, 240 middle school students completed a series of self-report measures in a single session. Results for this study showed that peer victimization and social anxiety are positively related to each other for middle school students. Self-concept mediated the relation between peer victimization and social anxiety; however, self-concept, parent support and classmate support did not moderate the association between peer victimization and social anxiety.

Comments

Advisors: Michelle K. Demaray.||Committee members: Christine K. Malecki; Nina S. Mounts; Julie A. Ogg; Brad H. Pillow.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

vii, 91 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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