Publication Date

1994

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Martin, Michael J.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Human and Family Resources

LCSH

College students--Alcohol use||Catholic college students--Alcohol use

Abstract

The present study examined the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic approaches toward religion and Roman Catholic college students’ drinking behavior. Among the sample of 277 students, 100 males and 177 females completed the Religious Orientation Scale and the Student Alcohol Questionnaire. The results indicate that a weak but significant inverse relationship exists between intrinsic religiosity and the total number of drinks consumed per week as well as the total number of problems experienced due to drinking for females only. The findings for females and the lack of significant relationships among the variables for males are discussed from a sociocultural perspective. Possible explanations for the findings are that females are more likely to allow their religious beliefs to influence their drinking behavior while males are more strongly influenced by their peers and drink more heavily regardless of religious orientation.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [45]-48)

Extent

58 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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