Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Schmidt, James D.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of History

LCSH

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints--History--19th century|Mormons--Relations--United States--History||Gentiles--Relations--United States--History||Communitarianism--Religious aspects--Mormons

Abstract

This thesis explores the lives of the non-Mormon minority that lived within early Mormon communities. Understanding the nature of community formation and the role of passive religious dissent on the frontier of antebellum America problematizes monolithic narratives of religious conflict. A more localized exploration of Mormon/non-Mormon interaction provides insight into how these communities changed over time and how economic issues were central to their viability. Other studies of these relationships have focused on the conflict that arose between Mormon communities and their neighbors. By framing this investigation in terms of the opportunities for collaboration, I argue that these communities were more stable when they were economically integrated. This conclusion is evidenced by drawing from letters, journals, and newspaper reports from non-Mormon residents as well as the public statements and sermons of Mormon leaders.

Comments

Advisors: James D. Schmidt.||Committee members: Aaron S. Fogleman; Anne G. Hanley.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

105 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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