Publication Date

1957

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Martin, James J., 1916-||Jameson, Hugh

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Social Sciences

LCSH

United States--Civilization||United States--Intellectual life

Abstract

I propose to discuss some aspects of specialization as it exists in several phases of our culture and discuss these in relation to the research done by others who have been more specific in their fields. I intend to demonstrate why I believe that the profit motive is the primary factor in these aspects in a logical completion of them. The tendency or direction of our subject matter--assuming that all forces and factors of a social nature involve some concept of motion--seems to be toward mechanical specialization which has the additional characteristics of increased size and speed. A look at specialization as it is evident in communication, technology, and education provides a degree of insight in the attempt to demonstrate how the economics of these aspects is tied up with a fetish to grow bigger and better.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

45 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS