Author

Tim Satterlee

Publication Date

2015

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Calvo, Ana M.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Biological Sciences

LCSH

Genetics||Microbiology||Bioinformatics||Aspergillus flavus--Genetics--Research||Fungi--Morphology--Research

Abstract

This thesis involves two papers both of which involve members of the important fungal genus Aspergillus. The first paper involves the characterization of the rmtA gene, which encodes a putative arginine methyltransferase, in the agriculturally important fungus Aspergillus flavus. This methyltransferase has been described to be involved in epigenetics regulation through histone modification in the phylogenetically close model organism Aspergillus nidulans. Epigenetics regulation affects a variety of cellular processes, including morphogenesis and secondary metabolism. This study focuses on the role of rmtA on fungal morphological development, including the production of conidia and sclerotia, and the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (also denominated natural products), particularly the possible effect of rmtA in the production of aflatoxin, a highly carcinogenic mycotoxin synthesized by A. flavus. This fungus colonizes important oil seed crops such as corn, peanuts, sorghum, treenuts and cotton worldwide, contaminating them with aflatoxin and other harmful potent toxins.;The goal of the second study is to identify the core genome of the fungal genus Aspergillus. We compared seven different species to determine which genes were shared among the genus. Additionally, we looked for the core genome by comparative genomics using phylogenetically close fungi, determining which genes belonged solely to Aspergillus. Attached in the supplemental table is the list the Aspergillus common and core genome.

Comments

Includes supplementary digital materials.||Advisors: Ana M. Calvo.||Committee members: Mitrick Johns; Thomas Sims.

Extent

76 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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