Publication Date

1988

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Sechrist, Karen R.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

School of Nursing

LCSH

Child psychology||Injections, intravenous||Massage for children||Ice||Pain--Psychological aspects

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ice massage on children's perception of pain during venipuncture. Ice massage is defined as a form of cutaneous stimulation that has potential as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure. Eleven hospitalized children between the ages of 7 and 16 tested the following interventions: routine venipuncture without ice massage, venipuncture with ice massaged contralaterally to the site, and venipuncture with ice massaged proximally to the site. Perception of pain was obtained utilizing a 10-centimeter pain scale. Results indicated that there was significantly less pain reported when ice was applied to the contralateral site, versus routine venipuncture without ice massage. There were no significant differences when ice was applied proximal to the site and with no ice massage. There were also no significant differences when ice was applied contralaterally and when ice was applied proximal to the site.

Comments

Bibliography: pages [39]-41.

Extent

v, 51 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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