Author

Frank Wojan

Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Broeder, Craig E.

Degree Name

M.S. Ed. (Master of Education)

Department

Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education

LCSH

Kinesiology||Physiology

Abstract

Purpose: The study investigated the acute responses of altitude (Denver, CO) simulation during high intensity interval training and the subsequent supplementation of oxygen to facilitate greater recovery. Lacking literature on the subject matter is a major consideration for completion of the study. We hypothesize that oxygen supplementation during an acute bout of high intensity interval training with accompanying altitude will allow for greater recovery. Methods: Seven healthy cyclists aged 40.9 +/- 7.01 (Height: 68.4 +/- 4.98: Weight: 171.3 +/- 33.29: 19.3% +/-7.41%: VO2 Max L/min 4.12 +/- 1.17) performed baseline VO2max testing and three subsequent separate randomized trials consisting of three HIIT and recovery intervals with varying conditions. Session A: altitude intervals / supplemental oxygen recovery. Session B: sea level HIIT / sea level recovery. Session C: altitude HIIT / sea level recovery. Trial intensity will be established by cardiac output prediction and set at 75% HIIT and 50% recovery in watts. Results: Supplemental oxygen following HIIT elicited significant responses in HR (p<0.035, p<0.012), VO2 (p<0.029, p<0.030, p<0.004, p<0.001), cardiac output (p<0.012, p<0.002), and right quadricep oxygen saturation (p<0.011, p<0.013, p<0.009). Conclusion: The implementation of supplemental oxygen following altitude simulation with HIIT will facilitate greater recovery. Although significance was found among multiple variables, more subjects are needed for other to become significant.

Comments

Advisors: Peter Chomentowski.||Committee members: Craig Broeder; Anthony Deldin.||Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

vii, 55 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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