Author

Alison Lang

Publication Date

1997

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Lovejoy, M. Christine

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Teenagers--Suicidal behavior||Suicide--Prevention||Adolescent psychology||Mothers--Psychology

Abstract

Many help-givers for suicidal adolescents are peers and parents. This study examined adolescent and mother perceptions of the suicide risk associated with different warning signs, their perceptions of the helpfulness of interventions, students' intent to use interventions and mothers' beliefs about their children's intent to use interventions. Mothers viewed behavioral and high-risk warning signs as indicating higher suicide risk than emotional and life event warning signs, whereas students viewed high-risk suicide warning signs as indicating higher suicide risk than behavioral, emotional, and life event warning signs. Students viewed professional interventions as less helpful than mothers. Students rated talking to the suicidal individual as the intervention they intend to use the most; mothers also rated talking with the suicidal individual as the intervention their children would most often use. Implications of these findings include continuing to research the ability of peers and parents to provide adequate help in risk situations.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [78]-83)

Extent

vi, 131 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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