Publication Date

1995

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Schubert, James N.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Political Science

LCSH

HIV infections--Government policy--United States--States||Medical policy--United States--States||AIDS (Disease)--Government policy--United States--States

Abstract

HIV and AIDS have been public health crises for over a decade. A national strategy is created by the aggregation of the states' policies. Researchers have categorized and described the various legislative approaches states have taken to address HIV and AIDS. Few researchers have attempted to explain why states use different methods to combat the disease. Likewise, researchers have demonstrated the utility of political culture in explaining state policy outputs. This study examines variables of state HIV/AIDS related legislation within the framework of political culture as defined by Daniel Elazar. The purpose of this study is to determine if there are significant differences in the legislation relative to political culture. Directions for future research are indicated and described.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [82]-84)

Extent

iv, 84 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS