Publication Date

1986

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Luckenbill, David

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Sociology

LCSH

Lynching--History||Southern States--Race relations

Abstract

This study analyzes lynching rates in the South-Central region of the United States from 1889 to 1918, by race and alleged offense, to determine whether lynching was used by Southern Whites to deter crime or to enforce racial subordination. The race and offense variable were regressed on the lynching rate using Ordinary Least Squared Time-Series Multiple Regression. The results of the statistical analysis indicate that the variations in the lynching rates could be accounted for by the race variable, which is supportive of the explanation for the high rates of lynching as a means to enforce racial subordination.

Comments

Bibliography: pages [28]-32.

Extent

v, 43 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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