Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Pittman, Laura D.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Clinical psychology

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a pervasive chronic illness, and approximately 2.3 million individuals worldwide are diagnosed with MS. Those with MS are often women of childbearing age and, thus, understanding how the disorder impacts these mothers and their families is important. The current study examined potential mechanisms through which maternal MS symptom severity influences child psychological functioning (i.e., internalizing and externalizing symptoms). Complete data were collected from 75 mothers diagnosed with MS via online data collection methods. Results indicated some support for previous research in that MS symptom severity was associated with poorer psychological functioning in children. Furthermore, there was an indirect association of maternal MS severity on child internalizing symptoms through maternal lax control. Furthermore, there was an indirect association of maternal MS severity on child externalizing symptoms through maternal depressive symptoms and maternal acceptance. Limitations, clinical implications, and future directions are discussed.

Comments

Advisors: Laura D. Pittman.||Committee members: Michelle M. Lilly; Karen J. White.||Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

vi, 114 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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