Publication Date

2018

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Radasanu, Andrea M., 1973-

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Political Science

LCSH

Philosophy||Political science

Abstract

Jean-Jacques Rousseau gives Plutarch's Parallel Lives a prominent role in his treatise on education, Emile. In many ways, this decision is perplexing because Plutarch's teachings concerning virtue and vice seem to pose a direct threat to Rousseau's educational regimen which aims to produce a natural, whole, and sincere man. However, upon closer examination, there is evidence that suggests that Rousseau fully recognizes how Plutarch's writings can threaten his program, which leads him to institute several innovative changes to how the Parallel Lives is administered in the Emile. Namely, the natural man is only allowed to be exposed to a few, heavily edited individual biographies, in order to ensure that he is inoculated from wanting to be anyone but himself. These distinct changes have powerful effects on the manner in which the natural man lives in society with his fellows.

Comments

Advisor: Radasanu, Andrea.||Committee members: Pickerill, James M.; Schraufnagel, Scot.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

30 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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