Author

Kim E. Gibson

Publication Date

1983

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Austin, Gary F.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Communicative Disorders

LCSH

Self-perception||Deaf--Psychology||Tennessee self concept scale

Abstract

The Tennessee Self Concept Scale (Fitts, 1965), although potentially useful as a counseling and research tool for professionals in deafness, presents problems for many hearing impaired persons because of its high readability and use of idioms and complex language structures. The tasks of this preliminary investigation were revision to a lower language/reading level and the subsequent gathering of reliability and beginning normative data. The review of the literature explored three main areas: the relationship of self concept to academic achievement, self concept and deaf and hard of hearing persons, and analysis of existing self concept assessment methods. The sample group for the study included 77 hearing subjects, 75 deaf subjects, and 27 hard of hearing subjects, ages 12-21. The hearing subjects were given the original and revised forms of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale at a two to four week interval, to assess form a-form b reliability. The deaf and hard of hearing subjects were given the revised TSCS twice, at a two to four week interval , to provide data on test-retest reliability. All testing was done with concurrent screening for reading level. The hypotheses (stated in the null) were as follows: 1) There will be no significant correlation between Total P scores on the original and revised forms of the TSCS when administered to hearing subjects, ages 12-21, at a two to four week interval. 2) There will be no significant correlation between Total P scores on the revised form of the TSCS, when administered twice to deaf subjects, ages 12-21, at a two to four week interval. 3) There will be no significant correlation between Total P scores on the revised form of the TSCS, when administered twice to hard of hearing subjects, ages 12-21, at a two to four week interval. Data for all subjects were analyzed using a Pearson Product- Moment correlation formula. Total P correlations for all three groups were positive and significant at the .01 level of confidence. All three null hypotheses were rejected. In addition, reliability was analyzed for 11 TSCS subscores for various hearing impaired subgroups, namely age, sex, educational setting, and age at onset of hearing loss groups. Generally positive, statistically significant r values were found. Results were analyzed, and implications for further research were discussed.

Comments

Bibliography: pages 69-73.

Extent

vi, 199 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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