Publication Date

1965

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Wells, Philip C.||Alexander, Virgil

Degree Name

M.S. Ed. (Master of Education)

Department

College of Education

LCSH

Student records

Abstract

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM A government survey indicated approximately 90 per cent of urban schools throughout the country were in the process of revising their reporting methods during the past five years or within the next five years. It further indicated that 50 per cent of these schools were enlisting parental cooperation in such revisionary work. It was the purpose of this study to determine whether the combined efforts of parents and educators alike could develop a report card which both satisfied the needs of the community and met the basis standards set forth by authorities on the subject. METHODS AND PROCEDURES A two year study entitled "Patterns of Communications" was undertaken by the Rockford School System in 1963 for the purpose of revising a much criticized elementary report card. This group, composed of both educators and parents, reviewed research literature, surveyed parents, reactions, developed experimental report cards for trial use, and evaluated parent and teacher reaction to the new report form. The writer actively participated in this project and has presented an evaluation of its effectiveness. A review of the literature provided a list of basic standards set forth by authorities, together with results of surveys of current practices. These were used as a yardstick with which to measure Rockford's new report card. The organization of the study group was presented in detail, together with techniques and procedures used in surveying parents and teachers, developing experimental report forms, and evaluating community reaction. CONCLUSIONS The research project which developed the newly adopted report card in Rockford was definitely a community venture. Not only were parents, teachers, and administrators active participants as members of the research group, but varied opportunities were offered to the parents and teachers of Rockford to express their preferences, ideas, and suggestions. That the new report form should be well received is clearly indicated by the results of the evaluation questionnaires. With few exceptions, the new report form measured well against the yardstick of basic standards suggested by educators. It can be stated, with few reservations, that the combined efforts of Rockford parents and educators have developed a report card which satisfied the needs of the community and met the basic standards set forth by authorities on the subject.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

vi, 66 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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