Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Rosenbaum, Alan

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Intimate partner violence--Psychological aspects||Wife abuse--Religious aspects||Women--Abuse of--Religious aspects||Sexual dominance and submission--Psychological aspects

Abstract

Feminist theories have long proposed that conservative religious beliefs influence male-to-female partner violence (MFPV) by contributing to a belief system supporting male dominance and female submissiveness in relationships. The present study empirically assessed this proposed relationship, exploring the extent to which men's beliefs about female submission and men's use of interpersonal control contribute to the theoretical link between conservative religiosity and MFPV within heterosexual marriages. The extent to which men's perceptions of their wives beliefs about female submission contribute to MFPV was also assessed. A multiple mediation model was supported in which 1) men's beliefs about female submission mediated the relationship between men's conservative religiosity and men's use of interpersonal control, and 2) men's use of interpersonal control mediated the relationship between men's beliefs regarding female submission and MFPV. Men's perceptions of their wives beliefs about female submission did not strengthen these indirect effects. These findings highlight the importance of exploring the relationship between religiosity and MFPV in context, specifically by identifying the complex process through which men's beliefs about female submission and men's use of interpersonal control increase the risk of MFPV in marriage. Implications for researchers, religious leaders, and treatment providers are discussed.

Comments

Advisors: Alan Rosenbaum.||Committee members: Michelle M. Lilly; Kristen Myers; Shane Sharp; Thomas J. Smith; Karen J. White.||Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

vi, 63 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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