Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Sheehan-Holt, Janet K.||Ilsley, Paul J.

Degree Name

Ed.D. (Doctor of Education)

Department

Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education

LCSH

Graduate students--Middle West--Psychology||Adult college students--Middle West--Attitudes||Universities and colleges--Middle West--Graduate work--Public opinion

Abstract

This investigation explores relationships among personality characteristics and beliefs about knowledge and learning among adult students at the graduate level. Establishing connections among adult and higher education, psychology, and philosophy, this study investigates how personality characteristics and beliefs about knowledge and learning are connected. The individual personality characteristics of sensing, intuition, thinking, feeling, judging, and perceiving, as well as the beliefs about knowledge and learning, were measured quantitatively using self-report instruments. The factor analysis that was conducted on the beliefs questionnaire resulted in only one factor being realized. The factor that did emerge, Simple Knowledge, was statistically significantly correlated with the personality characteristic of intuition in adults in higher education. When the functions of perception and judgment were combined, Simple Knowledge was statistically significantly correlated with sensing/thinking and sensing/feeling in a positive direction. Intuition/thinking and intuition/feeling were statistically significantly, negatively correlated with the Simple Knowledge factor. Individuals who scored themselves as sensing, sensing/thinking, and sensing/feeling were all more likely to believe in Simple Knowledge. Individuals who scored themselves as intuitive, intuitive/thinking, and intuitive/feeling were all less likely to believe in Simple Knowledge. This research suggests that an important way to facilitate learning is to evaluate adults’ personalities and beliefs about knowledge and learning. Moreover, potential problems are revealed through “road blocks” to learning, certain personality types, and the ways adults construe knowledge. Educators at all levels may want to consider that beliefs about knowledge affect how one learns.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [110]-116).

Extent

ix, 137 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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