Publication Date

1964

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Kilpatrick, Julia||Reed, Mary Frances, 1906-

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Home Economics

LCSH

Ability grouping in education||Dressmaking

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to compare certain Home Economics I classes at Joliet Township High School in order to find differences in progress in clothing construction when they are in homogeneous and heterogeneous groupings. The writer explored two hypotheses: (1) Students perform better or progress faster if they are in homogeneous groupings. (2) The student who has had junior high clothing construction performs with a greater degree of skill both at the beginning and end of a clothing unit than does the student who has not had junior high clothing construction. The students were grouped in three experimental classes for the study: a homogeneous class, all of whoso members had clothing construction in junior high school; a second homogeneous class, none of whose members had clothing construction in junior high school; and a control class, a heterogeneous group, some of whose members had clothing construction and others who had not. Two tests were constructed, one written end objective in nature cowering knowledge of subject matter, while the other one gave evidence of the degree of skill a student displayed in constructing a miniature blouse. These were administered in the following sequence! a pre-test, e clothing construction unit, and e poet-test. Findings indicated a significant difference in means of scores between classes of students having had junior high clothing construction and those who did not. The hypothesis that students perform with a greater degree of skill both at the beginning and end of a clothing unit than do the students who have had no clothing construction was accepted. The hypothesis that students perform better or progress fester if they are in homogeneous groupings was not substantiated. Further study might reveal answers to the following questions: (1) In which area of clothing construction do students make the greatest and least progress? (2) Do the students from the heterogeneous class progress more like the junior high group or the non-junior high group? (3) How many school years of training would be necessary for a student to give evidence of a high degree of skill in clothing construction? (4) How well does a student perform in relation to her potential as implied by I.Q., ACE Psychological, and Reading Readiness scores? (5) Would any single test serve as the best prognosticator for a student's achievement in clothing construction?

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

vi, 56 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS