Author

James M. Horn

Publication Date

1971

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

McConnell, Harold||Flemal, Ronald C.

Degree Name

M.S. (Master of Science)

Department

Department of Geography

LCSH

Karst

Abstract

When compared with fluvial geomorphology, it is evi­dent that the present state of karst geomorphology is one of minimal understanding and sophistication. For equiva­lent lawfulness to evolve in karst geomorphology, it is imperative that some hypothesis of karst formation and distribution be universally accepted. This study addresses the utility of an overriding hypothesis that the spatial distribution of karst depres­sions results from geomorphic processes which contain random or quasi-random components. The spatial variation of karst surface depression development is considered with­in the framework of macroscopic randomness of geomorphic process. To operationalize the stochastic model, three alternative hypotheses are assessed with quadrat methods at the .20 level of significance for their plausibility of being responsible for the spatial distribution of karst depressions on the Blue River Limestones in the unglaciated portion of the Mitchell Plain of south-central Indiana. Data for the analysis were collected from 7.5 minute series U. S. Geological Survey topographic quadrangles. Results of the analysis indicate that two mutually independent, non-equally important random spatial processes of cavern roof collapse and surface corrosion are conceivably responsible for the spatial distribution of karst depres­sions in the unglaciated Mitchell Plain.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references.||Includes maps.

Extent

ix, 65 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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