Author

Brent Benner

Publication Date

1986

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Kaplan, Martin F.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Psychotherapists--Psychology||Hotlines (Counseling)||Crisis intervention (Mental health services)

Abstract

Congruency effects regarding subject preference for directiveness, expectation of directiveness, and degree of therapist directiveness were examined in a crisis-line analogue using 80 university students. Students with strong preferences for either directive or nondirective style were screened and then randomly assigned to one of eight conditions in which preference, expectancy, and therapist behavior were covaried. Subjects then discussed a personal concern of their choice with the therapist in a brief telephone interview. Dependent variables included two anticipated satisfaction measures, three subject disclosure measures, and two post-interview satisfaction measures. Preference/expectancy congruency effects were found for females on three of the four satisfaction measures and with males on two of the three disclosure measures. The results suggest partial support for the hypothesis that discrepancies between preference, expectancy, and therapist style are detrimental to the therapeutic process.

Comments

Bibliography: pages [88]-101.

Extent

vi, 168 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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