Publication Date

1995

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Milner, Joel S.

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Child abuse--Psychological aspects||Teenage girls--Psychology||Discipline of children--Psychological aspects

Abstract

Female adolescents with a childhood history of physical abuse (n = 20) and a matched group with no history of corporal punishment (n = 20) were presented vignettes depicting children committing moral, conventional, or personal transgressions and parents' inductive or power-assertive disciplinary response to the transgression. Mitigating information was included in half the vignettes. Adolescents evaluated moral transgressions as more wrong than conventional transgressions, which were evaluated as more wrong than personal transgressions. In general, transgressions containing mitigating information were regarded as less wrong than transgressions without mitigating information. Adolescents predicted more compliance for moral than for conventional or personal transgressions. Power assertion was evaluated as more effective, but less appropriate than induction. Although few of the expected group differences were found, recipients of childhood physical abuse predicted less subsequent compliance following discipline than the comparison group and reported the use of more power-assertive discipline by their own parents.

Comments

Includes bibliographical references (pages [113]-125).

Extent

xi, 216 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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