Author

Myung Ha Sur

Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Kim, So-Yeun||Zittel, Lauriece L.

Degree Name

M.S. Ed. (Master of Education)

Department

Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education

LCSH

Physical education and training||Psychology||Disability studies

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to a) measure parental self-efficacy and parenting practices of parents of young children between 2 to 7 years of age related to their physical development, b) examine the relationship between parental self-efficacy and/or parenting practices, and c) investigate sociodemographic factors related to parental self-efficacy and parenting practices. A total of 237 parents/caregivers were recruited throughout 27 states in the United States using both offline and online dissemination. The Preschool Parent Confidence Questionnaire (PPCQ) (Coleman, 2010) was used to measure parental self-efficacy. The modified version Parenting SOS (Vaughn et al., 2013) was utilized to measure parenting practices of participants. Descriptive statistics was used to examine levels of parental self-efficacy and parenting practices. Pearson correlation coefficient was utilized to investigate the relationship between parental self-efficacy and parenting practices. To examine demographic factors related to parental self-efficacy and/or parenting practices, Pearson correlation coefficient was used in continuous variables, and one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was utilized in categorical variables. The results showed that participants had moderate to high levels of parental self-efficacy and parenting practices. There were no differences regarding levels of parental self-efficacy and parenting practices between parents of children with and without disabilities. A significant moderate relationship was found between parental self-efficacy and parenting practices (r = .495, p < .001). No demographic factor was significantly related to parental self-efficacy or parenting practices in this current study (p > .05). In conclusion, parents of young children with and without disabilities had moderate to high levels of parental self-efficacy and parenting practices regarding physical development of their children. The moderate relationship between parental self-efficacy and parenting practices supports the theory of Bandura that self-efficacy can be a good predictor for change of human behavior.

Comments

Advisors: So-Yeun Kim; Lauriece Zittel.||Committee members: Todd Gilson.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

iii, 70 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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