Publication Date

2015

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Balcerzak, Scott

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of English

LCSH

Film studies||English literature||African American studies||Interracial friendship--History--20th century||Miscegenation in motion pictures--20th century||African American men in motion pictures--20th century||Women, White, in motion pictures--20th century||Motion pictures--History--20th century

Abstract

This thesis examines the historical implications of miscegenation and interracial interactions between minority males and white females in Post-World War II independent cinema. Elia Kazan's studio film Pinky (1949) exemplifies the perceived acceptable studio representations of interracial coupling. My examination of Kazan's film provides a starting point from which to evaluate other textual situations of interracial interaction, particularly in relation to casting. In contrast, Pierre Chenal's adaptation of Richard Wright's Native Son, Sangre Negra (1951) exhibits key differences in interracial depictions between studio productions and independent productions of that era. After a comparative analysis of Kazan's and Chenal's films, further exploration of George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) as an unintentionally racialized film, allows for an investigation into the casting of Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea as the primary characters. An analysis of these three films permits an evaluation of depictions of miscegenation and interracial interactions through an independent lens, distinguishing between acceptable mainstream allowances (via institutionalize censorship) of such depictions, and the comparative freedoms allotted to independent productions. This thesis provides an overview of the limitations of studio productions and their failures to adhere to changing social conventions, broadening the current discourse of film analysis from more canonized Hollywood films to lesser known and lesser criticized independent films, as well as establishing an understanding of Western culture's influence upon the censorship of racial depictions during this period.

Comments

Advisors: Scott Balcerzak.||Committee members: Ibis Gomez-Vega; Tim Ryan.

Extent

56 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

Share

COinS