Author

Jenny Wachter

Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Hill, Stuart A.

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of Biological Sciences

LCSH

Neisseria gonorrhoeae--Molecular aspects||Diseases--Molecular aspects||Molecular genetics

Abstract

Piliation is an essential virulence factor for the obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. PilE polypeptide is the major protein subunit in the pilus organelle and engages in extensive antigenic variation due to recombination between pilE and a pilS locus. pilS were so-named as they are believed to be transcriptionally silent, in contrast to the pilE locus. Despite the importance of pilE in pathogenesis, little is known regarding its regulation. Therefore, through small transcriptome analysis, we have identified a trans-encoded sRNA that was demonstrated to up-regulate expression of pilE. Furthermore, through small transcriptome analysis, in conjunction with analysis of pilS recombinants, we have identified both sense and antisense RNAs originating from most, but not all, of the pilS gene copies. Focusing on a single locus, we identified by site-directed mutagenesis a sense and antisense promoter. Analysis of available whole transcriptomes also revealed the presence of pilS-specific sRNAs in other pathogenic Neisseria. However, despite the presence of non-canonical promoter elements, investigation of available pil gene sequences revealed the presence of strong selection pressures, which provide support for host immune system pressure driving sequence polymorphisms within these variable genes. Overall, this study reveals an added layer of complexity to the pilE virulence gene.

Comments

Advisors: Stuart A. Hill.||Committee members: Rangaswamy Meganathan; Wesley Swingley; Yanbin Yin; Shengde Zhou.||Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

viii, 219 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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