Author

Testriono

Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Hamayotsu, Kikue

Degree Name

M.A. (Master of Arts)

Department

Department of Political Science

LCSH

Egypt--Politics and government||Indonesia--Politics and government|Democracy--Egypt||Democracy--Indonesia

Abstract

Why do elite conflicts in new democratic countries produce divergent political outcomes? Under what conditions do elite conflicts lead to the survival or the breakdown of democracy? Previous studies emphasize structural, institutional, and elite factors in explaining democratic breakdown, while overlooking popular mobilization as a factor. In proposing the interaction of two variables, elite conflict and mass mobilization, this thesis argues the divergent levels of the embeddedness of mass mobilization in elite conflict during political crisis result in either the survival or the breakdown of democratic regimes. I examine Egypt and Indonesia because they underwent severe elite conflict but had different regime outcomes. Egypt is a case of a high-level embeddedness of mass mobilization in an elite conflict during political crisis, which triggered a military takeover and resulted in the breakdown of Egyptian democracy. In contrast, Indonesia is a case of a low-level embeddedness of mass mobilization in an elite conflict during political crisis, which resulted in the survival of Indonesian democracy.

Comments

Advisors: Kikue Hamayotsu.||Committee members: Scot Schraufnagel; Kheang Un.||Includes bibliographical references.

Extent

58 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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