Author

Robert Fulton

Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Sandberg, Brian, 1968-

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of History

LCSH

France--History--Louis XIV, 1643-1715|Louis XIV, King of France, 1638-1715--Influence|Civil-military relations--France--History||Public administration--France--History

Abstract

This dissertation examines the operations of the civilian administration of the War Department in early modern France during the reign of Louis XIV. Specifically, it analyzes the documents that represent a wide variety of information which circulated within the War Department's administrative networks. I connect these sources to the work of a new group of civilian agents, the premier commis, and utilize them to infer in what manner they were able to effectively manage a rapidly increasing volume of information materials and to influence state development in a profound manner. This examination found all of these sources to be increasing not only in volume but in sophistication and standardization, reflecting a growing sense of professionalism and specialization within the civilian administration. In this endeavor, the premier commis in the bureaux worked to continuously manage administrative operations and workloads, progressively constructing an information state between the 1670s and the 1690s. The premier commis continually struggled with rapid and increasing information flows, while crafting regular and systematic methods of managing and ordering the massive amounts of information that circulated within War Department networks. Their efforts to manage the diverse logistical needs of French armies resulted in growing administrative power which reflected a transformation to administrative governance in France.

Comments

Advisors: Brian Sandberg.||Committee members: Aaron S. Fogleman; Ismael Montana.||Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

viii, 495 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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