Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

First Advisor

Malecki, Christine K.

Degree Name

Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)

Department

Department of Psychology

LCSH

Clinical psychology||Behaviorism (Psychology)||Personality

Abstract

Depression is a disorder that affects many adolescents. It can affect individuals from many different walks of life and can be devastating. While there are many factors that put an individual at risk, there are also factors that may serve to protect individuals. Two important factors that are related to depression are personality and perceived social support. It has been hypothesized that high levels of neuroticism and low levels of positive emotionality (a facet of extraversion) are underlying factors in depression. Furthermore, high levels of perceived social support from parents and classmates have been shown to decrease the risk of depression in adolescents. The present study sought to investigate the role of neuroticism and extraversion in the experience of depressive symptoms in adolescents. More specifically, the present study investigated whether extraversion moderates the relationship between neuroticism and depressive symptoms. It also sought to test whether perceived social support from parents and classmates served as mediators in the relationship between personality and depressive symptoms. Findings from the current study indicate that extraversion moderates the relationship between neuroticism and depressive symptoms. Additionally, perceived social support from parents or classmates did not serve as mediators in the relationship between personality and depressive symptoms. Implications of the findings from the current study are discussed.

Comments

Advisors: Christine K. Malecki.||Committee members: Michelle Demaray; Julia Ogg; Kelly Summers; David Walker; Kevin Wu.||Includes bibliographical references.||Includes illustrations.

Extent

v, 94 pages

Language

eng

Publisher

Northern Illinois University

Rights Statement

In Copyright

Rights Statement 2

NIU theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from Huskie Commons for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without the written permission of the authors.

Media Type

Text

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